Posted August 24, 2013

Fruit isn't the only thing on our orchards that has been growing this summer - our growers' kids are sprouting up right before our eyes as well! This year three of them will start preschool and two others will move on to kindergarten, giving us four in K-3. We're definitely getting into the back-to-school spirit: lunch boxes & what to pack for nutritious lunches, backpacks, pencils, paper, and all the other trappings that accompany the academic season! The kids are all excited to see their friends from last year and for the new friends they'll make, the projects they'll create and...

Posted August 3, 2013 ...
Posted August 21, 2013

Our staff had a wonderful time at the PMA Foodservice Conference in Monterey this year. Bill, Jeanette, & Jestene kept busy at the grill, talking with various retailers, supply managers, and food service teams while refilling samples of different ways to utilize our stone fruit and Apple Pears in simple, delicious recipes - showing you can bring stone fruit to the table in forms other than a fruit bowl.

They started off serving our Quick Crescent Pies as a breakfast option utilizing our Dapple Phoenix pluots...

Posted August 2, 2013

As with many stone fruits, peaches originated in China. It is in the Rosaceae, or Rose, family; genus species Prunus Persica. From China this delectable fruit spread to Persia, where it was widely cultivated. Alexander the Great furthered its spread into Europe - paintings of peaches were even found on the walls of Herculaneum, preserved despite the destruction of Vesuvius. In the 16th century, Spanish explorers brought it to the Americas and in the 17th century it was introduced to England and France. It was widely popular and in the Victorian era was served wrapped...

Posted July 16, 2013 ...
Posted June 12, 2013

Our friends at the American Academy of Chefs and the American Culinary Federation will be creating some fabulous recipes for us, which will be featured in our recipe section on a rotating basis - as well as a little bit about each of them. Our featured guest from fall 2012 - spring 2013 was Chef San Shoppell, chef-owner of Destination Chef. We had the opportunity to meet and work with Chef Shoppell at a culinary demonstration sponsored by the Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation at Leeward Community College and hope that you enjoy her recipes as much as we have.

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Posted June 4, 2013 ...
Posted May 29, 2013

Cody Lehman grew up near Burbank California where he worked for his family's construction company. He and Brittany Jackson got married in September of 2006 and Cody began working for his father-in-law Brent to learn the ropes of farming. This summer season will be his 7th season of growing fruit. I met with Cody to ask him a few questions at his home in Kingsburg about farming.

Q: Over the years what process or technologies do you think has been most helpful? Why?
A: The plant breeders have been the most helpful in the advancement of the fruit industry I’d say. They have...

Posted May 22, 2013
Posted May 20, 2013

Who kept the faith and fought the fight;
The glory theirs, the duty ours.

Wallace Bruce

On May 23, Arlington will transform into waving rows of red, white and blue in preparation for Memorial Day. In the following days, thousands of flags and candles will grace the graves of those who have fallen in service of our country.

For many, Memorial Day has come to mean little more than a 3 day weekend. A...

Posted May 17, 2013 ...
Posted April 18, 2013

The sweet smell of apricots tells us summer has arrived here in the central valley of California! These small golden fruits originated in China and were later introduced to Europe and Armenia. In 1720, the apricot tree made its way to Virginia but it wasn’t until 1792 that the tree became popular in North America. Apricots not only taste good, they are also packed with good nutrients! Some of the nutrients found in apricots include: vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber and potassium, which can help protect your eyes and heart as well as your digestive system.

Apricots can be enjoyed...

Posted April 9, 2013

Ryan Jackson is passionate about three main things: the Lord, his family, and farming. He grew up on and around the farm - learning the ropes from his dad was more like a part of normal day to day life than job training or working. From as young as five, he and his brothers would be given small tasks around the ranches such as pruning, suckering the trees, talking with field workers to learn Spanish, and driving tractor. They also held jobs in the packing sheds to learn the ins and outs of how all the equipment works, how much labor goes into sorting a good box of fruit, and how the two...

Posted April 4, 2013

We're only a few weeks out from starting the 2013 stone fruit season, and we couldn't be more excited! Here is a slideshow of how the fruit is looking so far!

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Posted February 28, 2013

Spring is a busy time of year in the orchards.

Our packing facilities and cold storages are undergoing a thorough deep cleaning before we begin the new season - repairing and sanitizing the machinery, cleaning all the storage totes, and other general maintenance.

And in the fields things are picking up rather quickly. The buds on the trees are all bursting open, with swarms of bees released among the trees to pollinate the blossoms. Leaf nodes begin to unfurl along the branches and everything seems to be waking up again. There’s grafting, spring planting, bloom...

Posted April 19, 2013

Brody Wilgenburg married Janelle Jackson in May of 2007. Brody grew up on a dairy in Hanford and attended Central Valley Christian High School. He then continued on to Cal Poly San Luis and graduated with a degree in Engineering. He and Janelle have three children, Jace, Bailey, and Brooklyn. I asked Brody a few questions about his start in farming stone fruit and this is what he said:

Q: When did you start working at Kingsburg Orchards/start farming?
A: In January of 2007 I started working for Brent, my father in-law, and I started farming on my own in 2010.

Q...

Posted February 20, 2013

Written by Heidi Jackson

It’s another summer morning and I’m awoken to the sound of the old rooster crowing right by my bedroom window - sometimes I thought my dad put food up on the tree by my window or trained him to go up there; whatever the case was, that old rooster never failed to wake me up in the summer. I give up on sleeping in longer. As always, the bird wins. I’m dressed and ready for the day, eating my breakfast in the kitchen, when my dad comes in and asks me if I want to ride around with him that day at work. Going to work with daddy meant you were sure to get all...

Posted February 12, 2013

The Chinese New Year is one of the most important of Chinese holidays, as it welcomes Spring in the lunisolar calendar. It is celebrated officially in over 9 countries, as well as unofficially in Chinatowns around the world. It begins on the first day of the lunisolar calender - this year, February 10th - and ends on the 15th day (Feb 24th) with the Lantern Festival. In Malaysia and Singapore, the 15th day is also viewed as a variation of Valentines Day called Chap Goh Mei. Single women write their number on a mandarin and toss it into a river or lake, and the single men collect them....

Posted January 30, 2013

Each year, we partner with Military commissaries in various reaches of the globe for our annual "Dinolicious" display contest. We receive many outstanding entries and would like to share their creativity and passion with you here. This slideshow is a collection of entries from 2009-2012 that we displayed at the Produce Marketing Association's Fresh Summit 2012 in Anaheim, California. We hope you enjoy these as much as we have!

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Posted January 10, 2013

The thick, misty grey Tulle fog has settled in over the Valley and will be coming and going until March. The leaves have all dropped from the trees, leaving limbs exposed and bare – rather eerily poking through the fog blanket. It may appear like the orchards have been left for dead, but in reality, they are getting a much-needed rest during their dormancy. In fact, each variety needs a certain number of chill hours to reach its maximum potential in the coming season. A chill hour is when the weather goes below 45˚F for a full hour. Chill hours are also important to know in the...

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